Author Archives: criticalwaves

Over and out

Critical Waves came to an end with two broadcasts on Resonance 104.4FM during June 2015.

To learn more about what Critical Waves was please see our About page.

To be entertained and informed by the cutting-edge arts and humanities research have a look at our Programme Archive, and enjoy the selection of short radio features developed by participating researchers.

The Critical Waves team would like to thank everyone involved in the project, including Birkbeck College, the ICA, Resonance 104.4FM and the Art and Humanities Research Council.

Most of all we’d especially like to thank the Critical Waves participants. Their energy and enthusiasm helped to generate interesting discussions about the potential role of radio in academic research, and their outstanding talent and willingness to share their research resulted in the great selection of fun and fascinating short radio programmes that you can find in our Programme Archive.

 

Elizabeth Johnson

PhD candidate at Birkbeck College, and co-founder of Critical Waves

 

 

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Part two of Critical Waves on Resonance

Last week we got off to a flying start with our first broadcast on Resonance104.4FM. Elizabeth Cetin and Rebecca Wright hosted features made by six participants from the Critical Waves events earlier this year. Lisa Mullen took us through the looking glass to explore the uncanny qualities of mirrors; Jono Gilmurray let us listen in to the sound of climate change; Arthur Keegen-Bole studied the role of radio in the music of the night; Becky Cullen considered what happens when we try to analyse poetry according to the criticisms of broadcaster and judge of the 2015 Forward Prize for Poetry, Jeremy Paxman; Aimee Gaston explored the significance of Virginia Woolf’s armchair; and Tom Wright took us inside a volcano.

Don’t worry if you missed it, you can catch it again on Resonance FM’s Mixcloud here.

Tonight, Elizabeth Cetin will return, this time accompanied by Claudia Firth, to guide you through our second and final installment in Critical Waves. Christopher Collier offers a glimpse into the beautiful game of three-sided football; Sonya Dyer considers the visual history of black women in space; Robert Herian brings alive the concept of fiduciary law; Robin Bale takes us on a tour of a disused space known only as the ‘bike cemetery’; Naomi Wynter-Vincent, examines the cost of thinking in an account of the work of psychoanalyst Wilfred Bion; Sarah Jackson examines the role of telephony in fiction; and Rachel Cattle offers an experimental work on women’s suffrage.

To catch all this tune in from 8-9pm tonight, Tuesday 30th June, on Resonance104.4FM.

Tune in to hear Critical Waves on Resonance

We are delighted to announce that two Critical Waves programmes will be broadcast on Resonance 104.4FM on Tuesday 23rd and Tuesday 30th June, 8-9pm.

The Resonance broadcasts will feature a selection of short programmes made by researchers who participated in the Critical Waves events, showcasing cutting-edge research from some of the brightest new talent in the arts and humanities.

Listen in to be inspired and intrigued by thinking off the beaten track, as researchers from across the UK explore; three-sided football, haunted mirrors, the cost of thinking, black women in space, the psychogeography of a bike cemetery, fiduciary law, the world of nocturnal music, the sound of climate change, and what happens when we analyse poetry according to Jeremy Paxman.

You can tune in at 104.4FM in London or online here

In the meantime, why not take a look at my article for the ICA blog, ‘Voices of Dissent: DIY Radio in the 21st Century’, which written in response to the ICA’s current exhibition Shout Out! UK Pirate Radio in the 1980s, and discusses some of the issues raised at the recent Critical Waves events.

And, if you’re a researcher thinking about what it’s like to make your own podcast, researcher from Royal Holloway, Laura Wood offers an account of her first time podcasting on her blog ‘Keeping it Eclectic’.

Listen to speakers’ presentations from Critical Waves at Birkbeck College

Here are recordings of all the presentations from Critical Waves at Birkbeck College in April 2015. Enjoy…

Listen to:

Radio futurologist James Cridland give a snapshot of radio usage today, revealing the medium’s resilience over the past century in the face of an ever-evolving media-scape.

Tim Markham, Reader in Journalism and Media at Birkbeck College, explore how thinkers like Heidegger have recognised radio as a medium that is intimate and imaginative; and as a means of creating distinct imaginative spaces, that can transcend physical place.

Emily Candela, researcher and producer of Atomic Radio, on what makes a good radio programme.

Musician and freelance producer for Resonance FM, Michael Garrad, offer an entertaining workshop that focussed on how to make audio recordings using basic equipment and free online software. (This presentation is included here more as a supplement to notes taken by participants who attended on the day, as Michael’s presentation involved a lot of visuals that are not represented here.)

Dr Juliette Kristensen, academic and producer of Paperweight Radio, share her reflections on the importance of radio as an aural and conversational form in an academic environment dominated by written work.

Tess Woodcraft on the work of Pod Academy, who promote new research through free online podcasts.

Listen to all this, and more, on our SoundCloud at soundcloud.com/criticalwavesradio

More Critical Waves at Birkbeck College

The spring sun greeted us last month as we gathered in the School of Arts at Birkbeck College for the second Critical Waves event. Having considered how the voice, radio and audio can be used as creative materials at the ICA in March, our cohort of postgraduate and early career researchers met again: this time to think about some of the more practical issues around using radio as a research tool.

Radio futurologist, James Cridland kicked off proceedings by offering us a snapshot of radio usage today, revealing the medium’s resilience over the past century in the face of an ever-evolving media-scape. If James asked us to imagine radio’s future, Tim Markham – Reader in Journalism and Media Studies at Birkbeck College – spoke to radio’s past, exploring how thinkers like Heidegger recognised radio as a medium that is intimate and imaginative; and as a means of creating distinct imaginative spaces, that can transcend physical place.

But how could researchers harness the special characteristics of radio and use radio as a tool to enhance research their practice? Current PhD candidate Emily Candela offered some answers by way of introducing Atomic Radio; her series of podcasts on visual representations of x-ray crystallography. With humour and candour, Emily led the group through some of the pleasures and pitfalls that she had faced in trying to translate her research into radio. Musician Michael Garrad followed up with an entertaining workshop that focussed on how to make audio recordings using basic equipment and free online software.

After the chance to chat over the lunch break, design historian Juliette Kristensen shared her reflections on the importance of radio as an aural and conversational form in an academic environment dominated by written work. Finally, Tess Woodcraft provided an inspiring end to what had proved to be a fascinating day, by describing the work of Pod Academy: an independent, not-for-profit platform for free podcasts on academic research.

While all the day’s presentations were interesting, informative and inspiring, the moment that stood out for me was Juliette Kristensen’s description of deciding to embark on her own series for Resonance104.4FM – Paperweight Radio. Juliette described her decision to make the work she wanted to make, without the need of an institutional mandate. I hope that some of the researchers gathered in the School of Arts that day left similarly inspired.

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Listen to speakers’ presentations from Critical Waves at the ICA

Here are recordings of all the presentations from Critical Waves at the ICA in March 2015. Enjoy…

As part of our panel on ‘Radio Play: Voice as Material’, hear:

sound and radio artist, Magz Hall offers a glimpse into the politics of the voice by reflecting on the voices are often excluded from the airwaves, before showcasing a range of DIY and creative approaches towards radio, which move away from what Magz refers to as “good voice syndrome”.

artist and composer Iris Garrelfs, share an insight into her practice, explaining Iris’ process of producing micro-collages from tiny slithers of audio recordings.

artist and curator, Sam Belinfante explore the voice as a form of contact – something transmitted and received, connected and disconnected – which plays with ideas of interiority and exteriority.

 

As part of our panel on ‘Disembodied Voices: Speaking and Authorship’,  listen to:

artist and activist, Marc Herbst discuss the bodies that are disembodied by the state and explore the power relationships enacted by the state through its voice.

artist, Aura Satz talk describe some of the ways in which her practice has used audio to displace authorship, allowing for a more mobile idea of where a voice might come from.

sound artist and radio producer, Lance Dann tease out some of the differences between analogue and digital listening, discussing the communal and serendipitous ways that we might tune into the wireless, as well as the podcast’s intimate and direct address.

Listen to all this, and more, on our SoundCloud at soundcloud.com/criticalwavesradio

Critical Waves at Birkbeck College, Monday 20 April, 9.45am – 4pm

After a great start at the ICA last month we’re looking forward to our next Critical Waves event at Birkbeck College on Monday 20th April. Here is a timetable of what to expect …

Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck College, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

This one-day program of talks and workshops follows the more theoretical day of presentations at the ICA by reflecting on the role of radio in academia today, and offering some introductory advice about how researchers can get started with communicating their own research through radio and podcasts.

Speakers include: Emily Candela design historian and producer of Atomic Radio; James Cridland, radio futurologist; Juliette Kristensen, academic and producer of Paperweight Radio; Tim Markham, Reader in Journalism and Media at Birkbeck College; Pod Academy.

09.45 – 10.00                  Registration

10.00 – 11.00              Radio in today’s academy: James Cridland in conversation with Tim Markham

Radio futurologist James Cridland and Tim Markham, Reader in Journalism and Media at Birkbeck College, will discuss how radio has been shaped by recent technological developments and consider radio’s position in contemporary research practice.

11.00 – 11:20                  Break

11:20 – 12:20              What makes a good academic radio programme?

Emily Candela, researcher and producer of Atomic Radio, will lead a workshop on what makes a good radio programme.

12:20 – 13:20              Technical tips

Michael Garrad, musician and freelance producer for Resonance FM, will offer an introductory-level explanation of how to make basic sound recordings using a laptop or mobile phone, as well as running through how to edit audio using free online audio software.

13.20 – 14.20                  Lunch    A light lunch will be provided

14.20 – 14.30                  Details about participant’s programmes and how to submit them

14.30 – 15.10              Translating research into radio

Dr Juliette Kristensen, academic and producer of Paperweight Radio, will share her experiences as a researcher working with radio.

15.10 – 15.55              Getting your programmes heard

Pod Academy will tell us about their work promoting new research through podcasts, and discuss other platforms for sharing academic audio content.

15.55 – 16.00                  Closing remarks